Some thoughts on Nylon putting greens

Some thoughts on Nylon putting greens

The picture is not our putting green, but is reflective of the typical coloring you will get with a nylon putting green.

We have a pretty strong history in the use and experiences with nylon putting greens.  There is no doubt that nylon is a highly durable material, has many appropriate uses, and a fresh, new nylon putting green looks and putts very well.  I should know.  I got my start with nylon putting greens and the first green I installed was in my backyard and was nylon.  This putting green was absolutely gorgeous when it was first installed in the summer of 2006.  It was an American-made product and was supposed to last for 15 years.

Nylon outdoor yarn is a fantastic material when new, and it’s very strong.  However, it’s more porous than polypropylene or polyethylene and tends to retain odor as a result.  The biggest problem with nylon greens is that they look beautiful (although darker) when installed, but they tend to change color and break down under our intense Arizona conditions.  Within less than 3 years, my putting green became a chalky blue-gray color and the tufting rows became very pronounced, eventually creating troughs that would capture the ball similar to a bowling green alley.  In general, nylon greens are much darker and you can see that by a quick search on the internet.  The biggest issue is that the material – even with significant UV protection – just doesn’t hold up and last in the Arizona conditions.  Indoors, a nylon putting green would work well.

We have experimented with nylon putting turfs from several manufacturers and the results have been similar in all cases.  Our experience continues to conclude that polypropylene based putting turfs are far superior in our intense Arizona conditions.

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